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•^ T^ S^^tvUaXU MONMOUTH COLLEGE BULLETIN, 



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MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS. 













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Qiiser vatory otMusic 




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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



PRESIDENTS OFFICE. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Monmouth, Illinois. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/conservatoryofnnu19nionm 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



COLLEGE CALENDAR FOR 1909-1910. 



Fall Term, September, 1909. 

Sept. 7, Tuesday, 9:00 a. m. — Examinations, Enrollment and Registration of Students. 

Sept. 8, Wednesday, 8:0) a. m. — Examinations, Registration and Enrollment of Classes 

Sept. 8, Wednesday, 1:30 p. m — The Fall Term Begins— Opening exercises in Auditorium. 

Sept. 9, Thur<;day a. m. — Kecitations begin in all departments. 

Nov. 25'26 Thursday and Friday —Thanksgiving recess. 

Dec. 16, Thursday — Term Recital. 

Dec. 18, Saturday, 2:30 p. m — Intermediate Recital. 

Dec. 21, Tuesday — The Fall Term ends. 

^^inter Term, January, 1910 

Jan. 5, Wednesday, 9:00 a. m. —Examinations, Enrollment and Registration of Students. 

Jan. 5, Wednesday, 1:30 p. m. — The Winter Term begins. 

Jan. 6, Thursday, a. m. — Recitations begin in all Departments. 

Feb. 13, Sabbath— "Day of Pray er for Colleges — 7:30 p. m.— College Sermon in 

Auditorium. 
March 10, Thursday — Term recital. 
March 12, Saturday, 2:30 p. m. — Intermediate Recital. 
March 15, Tuesday — The Winter Term ends. 

Spring Term, March, I9IO 

March 23 -Wednesday, 9:00 a. m. — Examinations for admission. Enrollment and Regis- 
tration of Students. 
March 23, Wednesday. 1:30 p. m. — The Spring Term begins. 
March 24, Thursday, a. m.— Kecitations begin in all Departments. 
June 3, Saturday, 2:30 p. m. — Intermediate Recital. 
June 6, Tuesdav, 2:30 p. m. — Term Recital. 



CONSEPvVATOPvY OF MUSIC. 



Monmouth College Conservatory 
of Music* 



Faculty and Instructors. 



THOMAS HANNA McMICHAEL, President. 

T. MERKILL AUSTIN, Director of the Musical Conservatory. Voice. 
Interpretation. 

A. B., Thiel College, 1882: A. M., Ibid, 1888; Graduate of New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, 

1887; finishing course under Ferd Sieber and Hcinrich Ehrlich, Berlin, Germany, 1890-91; 

Summer 1906 in London, England, in study with William Shakespeare and 

Alberto Randegger, 

EMILY THOMAS, Teacher of Advanced Piano. 

Graduate of New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, Mass,; finishing course under William Mason, 
New York, also Godowski in Berlin, Germany, 1903-1904. 

MRS. ALICE B. HOBAKT, Teacher of Violin and Piano. 

Oberlin Conservatory Student: Violin under Prof. J. A. DeMuth and F. G. Doolittle; Piano with Letitia 
Wattles; Violin with Prof. Holstein. 

FRANK H. SHAW, Harmony, Counterpoint, Composition, Advanced Piano, Organ. 

Graduate Oberlin Conservatory of Music, 1907; Theory, F. J. Lehman, A. E. Heacox; Piano, W. K. 
Breckenridge; Organ, G. W. Andrews. 

KATHARINE HANNA, Teacher of Piano 

Knox Conservatory. 1901: Subsequent study under William Sherwood ofCh!cago, B. J Lang of Boston, 1903; 

Rudolph Ganz, Chicago, 1905. 

KOYAL HUGHES, Voice Culture. 

Graduate Monmouth College Conservatory of Music, 1907; Post-Graduate course, 1908. 

NELLE PORTER. Assistant in Voice. 

Graduate Monmouth College Conservatory of Music, 1905; Post-Graduate course, 1907. 

MABEL GLENN, Methods or Public School Music. 

Graduate Monmouth College Conservatory of Music, 1908; Silver Burdett School of Methods, 1908. Teacher 
of Methods in the Public Schools of Monmouth. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 

Conservatory of Music 



Stands in the front rank of the well equipped and successful music schools of the 
Middle West. 

This prominent position has been attained by the employment of instructors of a high 
order of musicianship, and by constant aspiration after lofty ideals. 

Broad and cultured musicianship is the keynote of the Institution. 

its aim is to give a deep and thorough knowledge of music as well as to develop highly 
artistic performers. 

VOICE. 

The vocal department is under the immediate supervision of the Director. The fresh 
voices carefully placed and artistically trained which are the product of this department 
stand as its best testimonial. The Director will be ably assisted in this department the 
coming year as last by two of his school's most promising vocal graduates, Mr. Royal Hughes 
and Miss Nelle Porter. Both of these teachers have shown themselves eminently fitted for 
foundational voice teaching. 

Miss Porter will have charge of the elementary voice classes which have been so sue 
cessful the past year. Miss Thomas will also do a limited amount of vocal work. 



PIANO. 

In a Conservatory of Music the piano department is a highly important one. The piano 
is the instrument of the heme as well as the concert platform, and for the former as well ag 
the latter its performers should have thorough and artistic training. 

To this end we commend to our patrons a fine array of capable and successful teachers 
At the head of this department stands Miss Thomas, a teacher of wide experience, whose 
graduates by their performance attest her careful and artistic training. 

Mr. Shaw has proven himself a skilful and painstaking teacher who imparts a fine 
technique and holds up high ideals to his pupils. 

The undergraduate work is in the hands of two strong teachers. Miss Hanna and Mrs 
Hobart, both of whom have proved themselves capable of laying a broad and firm founda' 
tion for advanced work. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 



VIOLIN. 

This department is becoming one of the strong ones in the Conservatory. 

Mrs. Hobart has distinguished herself by the energy which she has sho\A/n in developing 
this department, and her efficiency as a teacher. Her pupils play with certainty, brilliancy 
and finish. The Monmouth College Orchestra formed and trained by her is a credit 
to the institution. 

ORGAN. 

Mr. Shaw has proven himself not only a most capable organist, but also a teacher of 
marked ability. With our large modern organ and such a competent teacher we offer organ 
study excelled by few schools. His wide study and brilliant performance enable him to 
create an enthusiastic interest among his pupils. 

THEOKY. 
The importance of this department in the education of a pupil can not be overestimated. 
The theory of music is to music what grammar and mathematics are to a literary education 
It is necessary to the proper understanding and correct conception and interpretation of the 
subject. 

HAKMONY, COUNTERPOINT, COMPOSITION. 

These subjects are under the instruction of Mr. Shaw, who brings to them a complete 
mastery of the subjects and unusual gifts in imparting them. 

The work of this department has been greatly strengthened by the advent of such a 
highly cultured instructor. 

INTERPRETATION, HISTOKY, NOKMAL COURSE. 

The first two courses are planned for the development of the artistic and interpretative 
faculties of the pupils They are designed to lead the pupil by means of the historical setting, 
and by the study of the composer's meaning to understand and present the content and intent 
of the composition. 

The normal eourse is designed to assist the pupil to arrange his knowledge, and reduce 
his material to a system adapted to the instruction of a pupil from the elementary to the 
advanced stages. 

To these three courses the director brings the benefit of his wide study and extensive 
experience. 

METHODS. 

The course in methods is proving popular and a number of young women have been 
preparing themselves for Public School work. Miss Glenn who has charge of this depart- 
ment has had thorough preparation for her work. She is a graduate of the Silver Burdett 
School of Methods as well as a vocal graduate of our own Conservatory. Having charge 
of the music in the Public Schools of Monmouth she will be enabled to give practical illustra- 
tions of her methods. 

There is a good demand for method teachers who not only know a little about sigh: 
singing, but who also have a good knowledge of vocal principles and music in general, 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 



EQUIPMENT. 

The large concert room is equipped with a Mason &■ Hamlin Artist Concert Grand and 
and a Steck Grand. These with our beautiful Memorial Organ permit us to present our 
recitals and concerts in an artistic manner. The small recital room has also a new Mason 
&- Hamlin Grand, which makes our pupils' recitals enjoyable. 

Each studio is equipped with good teaching pianos. 

RECITALS, ETC. 

It is only by constantly performing before others that a pupil gets such control of his 
power that he is enabled to appear to the best advantage. Kecognizing this, a pupil's recital 
is planned for each week at which pupils sufficiently prepared perform before the members 
of the faculty and students of the Conservatory. These recitals are not public recitals, 
rather "en familie," but preparation for public work. Our new Grand Piano will add much 
pleasure to these recitals. 

At the close of each term a public recital is given by those advanced pupils ready to 
benefit by public performance. 

At frequent intervals recitals are given by members of the Faculty, at which there is an 
explanation of the music performed, thus giving the students an opportunity to hear good 
music performed in an artistic manner. 

In addition to the Choral Concerts, Faculty and Pupils' Recitals, there are many con- 
certs of high order during the year which the students can attend. 

Each student is urged to hear all the good music possible in order that musical taste 
may be cultivated. 



10 MONMOUTH COLLEGE 



Co 



urses. 



The work of the Conservatory is divided into departments, graduation from any one of 
which requires in addition to its own completion certain specified work in Harmony, Counter' 
point or Analysis Course, Theory and History, and the giving of a recital, except in the 
teacher's course in which the pupil must do special work in the preparation for teaching. 

It is expected that all pupils in their graduating year will not take less than two private 
lessons a week and it is advised that in the winter term, piano pupils especially, shall take 
three lessons a week in order that their program may be artistically prepared. 



CERTIFICATE. 

It has been decided to offer a certificate to any pupil who has completed the require' 
mants of his Junior year in any department, and has appeared successfully with a public pef 
formance during the Junior year, giving his performance from memory. In addition to com' 
pleting the required work in his department, he must complete the harmony and interpreta' 
tion courses. 

PIANO. 

This course is laid out on broad lines, consisting of a short preparatory and a compre- 
hensive collegiate course, the latter requiring four years for an average student to complete. 

Appended is a specimen course formed on the study or etude system, along with which 
will be taught salon pieces and as many works of the masters as can be thoroughly learned. 

Modern teaching has shown that individuality must be cultivated. This desired end may 
be best attained, with students who do not accomplish rapid results, with a course of technique 
and pieces carefully selected to accomplish the principles invoved in the studies. 

The completion of the harmony. Counterpoint, History of Music, Biographical History 
and the Interpretation Course, and the giving of a public recital are required for graduation 
in this course. 

PREPARATORY. 

Table and piano work for finger and wrist development with special attention to the 
the development of the finger legato touch, major scales, chords and arpeggios. Studies by 
Kohler, Duvernoy and Loeschorn. 

COLLEGIATE. 

Mijor anJ minor sciles, common chords, dominant and diminished seventh chords, in 
all forms and tempos, movements embodying all kinds of touches. Technical work by 
Wolf, Pischna, JosefFy and Tausig. 

Studies and etude selected from Loeschorn, Bertini, Heller, (Phrasing,) Krause, (Trill j, 
Berens, (Velocity), Bach, (Little Preludes and two part inventions), Cramer, Clement, 
(Gradus ad Parnassum), Bach (Well Tempered Clavichord), Chopin (Etudes.) 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 1 1 



Salon pieces, selections from the best modern writers and the classics throughout the 
entire course. 

Pupils must have thoroughly studied and be able to render in a creditable manner the 
following compositions before entering the graduation year. One Mozart Sonata, three 
Beethoven Sonatas, three Preludes and Fugues from Bach's Well Tempered Clavichord, the 
following list by Chopin: two Mazourkas, two Waltzes, one Nocturne, one Polonaise, three 
three Etudes, two Compositions by Schubert, two by Schumann. 



Voice Culture. 

in this department advantages are offered which lead to the highest attainment in this 
line of art. 

VOICE PLACING 

Especial attention is given to the proper placing of the voice. This is considered of the 
utmost importance, as a neglect of it almost invariabl/ results in a permanent injury to the 
voice and often to the health. 

To accomplish this the pupil is instructed in a proper control of the breath, a perfect 
union of the registers, a free and easy emission of the tone, and a knowledge of the different 
timbres of the voice. 

By these means the voice is produced with equal beauty and brilliancy throughout the 
entire compass. 

This course will be upon the same lines as the piano course, preparatory and collegiate, 
taking approximately the same length of time. 

The definite length of this course must largely be determined by the readiness of the 
individual voice to respond to training. 

The completion of the harmony. History of Music, Biographical History and the Inter' 
pretation Course, and the giving of a recital are required for graduation. The pupil is 
advised to take the analysis course. 

PPvEPAPvATORY 

A thorough knowledge of the principles of breathing and breath control is imparted; 
exercises in breathing and tone placing; in agility and relaxation of muscles (pure tone can' 
not be produced with rigid muscles;) Ferd. Sieber's 8 measure studies and the ten studies Op; 
simple songs, carefully selected to assist the pupil in conquering his difficulties, will be used. 

COLLEGIATE. 

Exercises in agility, uniting of the tones, the swell, mezza voice embellishments, trill, 
etc., cover'ng all forms of scales and chords, both major and minor. The use of series, 
"Masterpieces of Vocalization,,' which is the graded series of Vocal studies selected from 
the celebrated works of all the great masters of singing. 



12 MONMOUTH COLLEGE 



Throughout the entire course a careful selection of songs from the best American, Eng' 
lish, German, French and Italian writers will be used, also arias from the operas and stand' 
ard oratorios. While songs in the foreign tongue will be taught in the vernacular, the 
greatest pains will be taken to give the pupil a clear and intelligible enunciation of the Eng' 
lish language and the advice will be to sing in our native tongue whenever practicable. A 
rich and full repertoire of songs and arias will be required before graduation. 

It is advised that Voice pupils study German and French. It is expected that all vocal 
graduates take at least three years of piano. 



Pipe Organ» 

Our Memorial Organ, the gift of Misses Delia and Nellie Davidson in memory of their 
mother, has placed us in a position to offer advantages in the line of organ study 
that few schools even in the largest art centers, can surpass. The mechanical part of the 
organ is as complete as the very largest organs, giving pupils unsurpassed experience in reg' 
istratlon. The tone is beautiful and refined, the action leaves nothing to be desired. 

In order to enter upon the study of the organ it will be necessary to have completed the 
preparatory and the first year of the collegiate course in piano, and is advised to keep up the 
study at the piano along with the organ study through the first two years' work. 

The course will be three years in length. The completion of the Harmony, Counter' 
point. History of Music. Biographical History and Interpretation Course, attendance at Chorus 
class for one year, and the giving of a recital will be required for graduation. 

ORGAN COURSE. 

Modern School of Organ by Chas. E. Clemens supplemented by work in Schneiders Trios 
Rheinberger Trios, Buck and Wilson Pedal Technique embodying the principles of pedal 
obligato playing, manual work and registration. 

Playing of Church tunes and Anthems, selections from the best writers for this instru' 
ment, including tee English and French Schools. Sonatas by Mendelssohn. Merkel, Rhein' 
berger, Guilmant and the works of Bach. Special care taken in forming competent church 
organists. 



Violin. 

PPvEPARATORY, 

The correct method of holding the violin and bow. The loachim system of bowing is 
used, which requires flexibility of the wrist and a free use of the forearm. 

Seleeted studies from Dancia, Hofmann, Kayser and Metzar are used, also Schraedick 
scales and book of technique. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 13. 

COLLEGIATE. 

David Violin School, Sevick, Kreutzer, Kode. Rovelli, Fiorillo. Sonatas by Le Clair, 
Tartini and Haendel; concertos by Acolay, Viotti, De Beriot, Bach, Goddard, Mendelssohn. 

Selections from the best composers are used throughout the course, with a view to apply- 
ing the principles of bowing, tone production and expression. 

Practice in ensemble work is also offered the pupil. 

Same requirements as in Piano Course. 

Our hope for a college orchestra has been realized by an organization of twentysix 
pieces. 



Theory. 

HAKMONY 

A thorough knowledge of keys, scales, signatures, intervals, triads chord connection, 
chords of all kinds including altered and augmented, suspensions, passing chords, melodic 
changes, and organ point will be required. The harmonizing of melodies and chorals. The 
playing of modulations of many kinds through all keys. This is followed by either the Coun- 
terpoint course of two terms or two terms of Analytical Harmony and Composition. 

COUNTERPOINT. 

Two part, three part and four part counterpoint, imitation. 

Analytical Harmony and Composition, Principles of Analysis, Reduction of florid pas' 
sages. Original work in different musical forms. 

HISTORY. 

The general history of music showing its growth an:l development. 

Early Christian music. Polyphonic Music, Monophonic Music, the rise of Instrumental 
Music in the classic form, the Opera, the Oratorio. Komantic Music. 

General Musical History covers a period of 20 weeks, 15 in the Fall Term and 5 in 
the Winter. It comprises the study of a text, lectures, and is supplemented by a card system 
and lectures covering the entire field of history. Biographical History comprises 15 weeks' 
work, the last 5 of the Winter Term and the Spring Term. It is taught by means of an 
exhaustive study of the lives, methods and style of writing and general characteristics of 
twelve of the greatest writers of music from a text, by writing a Biographical and a Critique 
paper on each life and by lectures. 



14 MONMOUTH COLLEGE. 



INTERPRETATION AND ANALYSIS. 



These subjects comprise a course of one lesson a week through the entire year. They 
are given in the form of lectures which explain all points of Interpretation. Analysis, the 
different forms of music, the orchestra, sound, etc. 



POST GRADUATE COURSE. 

Work is offered in all departments to graduates or advanced students which will be 
devoted chiefly to repertoire. This course is becoming very popular as shown by the num' 
ber of our graduates returning for advanced work. 



Monmouth College Choral Society. 

This society, while having its own officers and conducting its own affairs, is affiliated 
with the College, and offers students, at a merely nominal fee, the advantages of first'class 
chorus drill. Concerts cf the highest grade are given each year by the society. 

Membership in this society is gained by passing an examination. 

The Society this year conducted its Seventh Grand May Festival consisting of two even- 
ing performances and an orchestral matinee. The first performance consisted of selected 
choruses and solo numbers by Miss Esther May Plumb, Mr. Richard Czerwonky and Mr. 
Frank H. Shaw. The orchestral matinee was by the superb Minneapolis Orchestra con' 
ducted by Emil Oberhoffer. In the evening, the chorus and orchestra led by Mr. Austin 
with Miss Louise Ormsby. Garnet Hedge, and NA/m. Beard as soloists gave a brilliant and 
arstic rendition of Haydn's "Creation." 



MUSIC ELECTIVES. 

One year's study of music (two lessons each week), will be received as a credit of 35 
weeks to be applied on the elective of any group of college studies. 
The following courses are open for this purpose: 

I. Harmony and Counterpoint. 

II. Piano — Second, Third and Fourth Years Collegiate. 
Prerequisite —Preparatory Grade and First Year Collegiate. 

III. Voice, Any Collegiate Year. 
Prerequisite — Preparatory 

Credits on electives will not be given for music taken elsewhere. In order to obtain 
credit on music as an elective, the student must have passing records entered on the books, 
not only of the work on which credits are desired, but also of the work prerequisite to this. 
Credits must be obtained and entered upon the College records in the year the work is taken 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. \ 15 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

Students may enter at any time, but are not enrolled for less than the term they enter. 

In order to secure a diploma the student mu5t have finished the prescribed work, and 
must have spent at least one year in this institution. 

The privileges of the Musical Department are not extended on the same grounds to 
holders of scholarships as are the privileges of other departments of tbe College. 

Students attending College and desiring to take musical instruction are expected to take 
lessons in this department. No credits will be given for lessons taken elsewhere. 

Pupils should report to the President of the College, with whom they will make all the 
arrangements for entrance. 

The new Carnegie Library will be of great value to music students. It will give a 
quiet, pleasant place for students to get acquainted with the current events of the day, and 
also to be in touch with a good working library. As fast as means can be obtained there 
will be added the best of musical literature. Any one wishing to help in procuring such 
a library is invited to contribute either books or musical subjects or money to buy them. 

Also about one hundred volumes of the best musical literature, including histories, biog- 
raphies, etc., are in the Warren County Library. The reading room is free to 
students. 




16 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE. 



Tuition Kates. 



TEACHER 


SUBJECT 


LENGTH 

of 
LESSONS 


NUMBER 
LESSONS 
perWEEK 


I TUITION. 


Fall 
Term 


Winter 
Term 


Spring 
Term 


Mr. Austin 


Voice 

Inierpreta- 
tion. 
History. 


30 minutes 
30 minutes 
20 minutes 

or class 

Class. 

Class. 


One 

Two 
Two 

One 
One 


$18.75 
37.50 
27.00 

5.00 
5.00 


$12.50 
25.00 
18.00 

4.00 
5.00 


$12.50 
25.00 
18 00 




4.00 
5.00 


Miss Thomas 


Piano. 


30 minutes 
30 minutes 
20 minutes 


One 
Two 
Two 


15.00 
30.00 
20.00 


10.00 
20.00 
13.00 


10.00 
20.00 
13.00 


Mr. Shaw 


Organ or } 

Piano, f 

Piano. 

Harm'y } 

Private. \ 

Theory. 

Harmony 

in Classes. 


30 minutes 
30 minutes 
20 minutes 
or class 
30 minutes 
20 minutes 

60 minutes 


One 

Two 
Two 

One 
Two 

Two 


15.00 
30.00 
20.00 

15.00 
20.00 

12.00 


10.00 
20.00 
13.00 

10.00 
13.00 

8.00 


10.00 
20.00 
13.00 

10.00 
13.00 

8.00 


Mrs. Hobart 


Violin. 


30 minutes 

30 minutes 

20 minutes 

or class. 


One 
Two 

Two 


13.50 
27.00 

18.00 


9.00 
18.00 

12.00 


9 00 
18.00 

12.00 


Miss Hanna 

Mrs. Hobart 


Piano. 


30 minutes 

30 minutes 

20 minutes 

or class. 


One 
Two 

Two 


11.25 
22.50 

15.00 


7.50 
15.00 

10.00 


7.50 
15.00 

10.00 


Mr, Hughes 

or 

Miss Porter 


Voice. 


30 minutes 

30 minutes 

20 minutes 

or class. 


One 
Two 

Two 


11.25 
22.50 

15.00 


7.50 
15.00 

10.00 


7.50 
15.00 

10.00 


Mabel Glenn 


Methods. 


30 minute 
class. 


One 


11.25 
8.00 


7.50 
6.00 


7.50 
6.00 



CHORUS— Whole Year $3.00 

— First Term and Second Term, each 1 . 50 



Pianos can be rented and taken to pupil's room, or rented from private families at rea- 
sonable rates. Pipe Organ practice at 20 cents an hour. Pupils can enter at any time, 
but when entering later than the opening of the term one more lesson than taken will be 
charged. 



18 MONMOUTH COLLEGE 



Graduating Recitals. 

OF THE 
CLASS OF 1909 

Monmouth College Conservatory of Music 

T. MERRILL AUSTIN, Director, 

COLLEGE AUDITORIUM. 



MISS EDNA M. RAIT, Piano. 

MISS RUTH S. TUBBS, Soprano. 

Thursday, May 6th, 8 p. m. 
MISS ALICE BUKNSIDE, Organ. 

Assisted by MISS MARY COLEMAN, Contralto. 
MR. JAMES K. QUAY, Bass. 

Tuesday, May 11th, 8 p. m. 
MISS ALICE H. BUKNSIDE, Piano. 

MISS HELEN MOORE, Soprano. 

Assisted by MP.S. FKANK H. SHAW, Violin. 

Thursday, May 1 3th, 8 p. m. 
MISS JEAN ACHESON, Soprano. 

MISS ELSIE GATES, Piano. 

Tuesday, May 18th, 8 p. m. 
MISS ELEANOR AUSTIN, Piano, 

MISS ETHEL LOWRY, Contralto. 

Thursday, May 20th, 8 p. m. 
MISS ANNETTA FRAZIER, Contralto. 

MISS PEARL LEVINE, Piano. 

Thursday, May 29th, 8 p. m. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



19 



MAY 6. 



MISS EDNA M. KAIT, Piano. 
MISS RUTH S. TUBBS, Soprano. 



(a) 


Linda di Chamounix (O! Light Divine) 


Donizetta 


(b) 


I will Extol Thee, O Lord— (Eli) 

MISS TUBBS 


Costa 




Etude Op. 25 No. 3 


Chopin 




Etude Op. 25 No. 7 


Chopin 




Etude Op. 25 No. 2 


Chopin 




MISS RAIT 




(a) 


From Monte Pincio Op. 39 No. 1 


Grieg 


(b) 


NA/'andering ^ . , , ^ 


Schubert 


(c) 


In Summer Fields, Op. 86, No. 2 


Brahms 


(d) 


He, of all the Best . , , , 

MISS TUBBS 


Schumann 


(a) 


Siegmund's Love Song . , . . 


Wagner- Brassin 


(b) 


In Autumn, Op. 15, No. 1 ' ' ' 


Mrs. H H A. Beach 


(c) 


Etude de Concert 'n D flat 

MISS RAIT 


Listz 


(a) 


O, Flower of All 


J. M. Metcalf 


(b) 


The Nightingale , - - , . 


Ward Stephens 


(c) 


Asleep , , . , , 


Amy Woodforde-Finden 


(d) 


In Happy Mood - , . . ^ 

MISS TUBBS 


C. Chaminade 




Rondo Brilliant , . . . 


Hummel 




Larghetto Maestoso 






Allegro Grazioso 






MISS RAIT 





20 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 



MAY II 



Sonata ill 



MISS ALICE H. BURNSIDE, Organ, 

Assisted by 

MISS MARY COLEMAN. Contralto 

MR. JAMES K. QUAY. Bass. 



Allegro con fucco 
Adagio 
Fuga 



Honor and Arms- 



Prelude et Fugue, E minor 

Berceuse 

Fantaisie, E ' 



Ah I Kendi Mi 



MISS BURNSIDE 



MR QUAY 



MISS BURNSIDE 



MISS COLEMAN 



Guilman 



Hande! 



Bach 

Saint Saens 

Parker 



Rossi 



Andantino 

Abendfriede 
Corona.ion March 



MISS BURNSIDE 



Franck 

P^heinberger 

Svendsen 



CONSERVATOKY OF MUSIC. 



21 



MAY 13 



MISS ALICE H. BURNSIDE. Piano. 
MISS HELEN MOORE, Soprano. 
Assisted by 
MRS. FRANK H. SHAW, Violin. 



Sonata Op. 45, for Piano and Violin , , ^ 

Allegro Appassionato 

Komanza 
MISS BURNSIDE AND MRS. SHAW 



Grieg 



(a) Farewell ye Limpid Springs (Japhthi) 

(b) All'udir del sistro il suon ^Carmen) 

MISS MOORE 



Handel 
Bizet 



(a) Pastorale 

(b) Romance in F Sharp 

(c) Grillen 

( a) Marie at the Lattice 

(b) The Nightingale 

(c) Faithfulness 

(d) Should he Upbraid 



(a) Prelude, C sharp minor 

(b) Chant Sans Paroles 

(c) 2nd Scherzo 



MISS BURNSIDE 



MISS MOORE 



MISS BUKNSIDE 



Scarlatti'Tausig 
Schumann 
Schumann 

Franz 
Delibes 
Brahms 
Bishop 



Rachmaninoff 

Sinding 

Karganoff 



(a) Goodbye, Summer 

(b) Tender Ties 

(c) The Silver King 

(d) Summer 



MISS MOORE 



Lynes 

Delbruck 

Chaminade 

Chaminade 



11 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 



MAY 18 



MISS JEAN ACHESON, Mezzo Soprano. 
MISS ELSIE GATES, Piano. 



(a) As When the Dove (Acis and Galathea) 

(b) Dost Thou Know that Sweet Land (Mignon) 

MISS ACHESON 



G. F. Handel 
A. Thomas 



Sonate — E minor. Op. 7 ' ' 

Allegro Moderate 

Alia Menuetto 

Finale ( Molto-Allegro) 
MISS GATES 



Grieg 



(a) Non ti scordar di me , ^ .. 

(b) Love's Message , . , 

(c) Spring Song , . , , 

(d) My Mother Bids me Bind my Hair 

MISS ACHESON 



V. Robaudi 

Schubert 

Rubinstein 

Haydn 



(a) Papillons, Op. 2 

(b) Consolation No. 5 

(c) Polonaise in E flat. Op. 14, No. 2 



(a) Violets for Thee I Gather 

(b Sweet Wild Roses 

(c) A Hope 

(d) Where the Bees Roam 



MISS GATES 



Schumann 

Liszt 

Rubinstein 



E. Meyer-Helmund 

H. A. Cesek 

Winter Watts 

Herbert Bunning 



MISS ACHESON 



Concerto, Op. 79 



Weber 



MISS GATES 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 



MAY 20 



MISS ELEANOR AUSTIN. Piano. 
MISS ETHEL LOWRY, Contralto. 



23 



(a) "He was Despised" (Messiah) 

(b) "Vittoria mio core" 

(c) "Non torno" 



MISS LOWRY 



Handel 

Carissimi 

Mattei 



Sonata, Op. 31, No, 2 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Allegretto 
MISS AUSTIN 



Beethoven 



(a) Sapphic Ode 

(b) Death and the Maiden 

(c) A Swan 

(d) I'll not Complain 



(a) Magic Fire 

(b) Idyl in G 

(c) Earlking 



MISS LOWKY 



MISS AUSTIN 



Brahms 

Schubert 

Greig 

Schumann 



Wagner- Brassin 

McDowell 

Schubert'Lizt 



(a) Summer Rain 

(b) A Dream 

(c) Sweet is Tipperary 

(d) The Nightingale's Song 



MISS LOWRY 



Concerto, Op. 40 in D minor 
Adagio 

Presto Scherzando 
MISS AUSTIN 



Willeby 
Allen 
Fisher 
Nevin 



Mendelssohn 



24 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE. 



MAY 27 



MISS ANNETTE FKAZIER, Contralto. 
MISS PEARLE LEVINE, Piano. 



(a) The Lord is Risen, ("The Light of the World" ) 

(b) When a Lad Comes Young and Slender. ("Der Freischutz") 

MISS FRAZIER 



Sullivan 
Weber 





Sonate. Op. 10, No. 3 


Beethoven 




Presto 






Largo 






Minuetto 






Rondo 






MISS LEVINE 




(a) 


Dedication , . . , , 


Schumann 


(b) 


My Delight , , , . . 


Chopin 


(c) 


Farewell , , , . , 


Franz 


Id. 


Patria ..,,.. 

MISS FRAZIER 


Mattei 


(a) 


Rigaudon, Op. 204 - . - - 


Raft 


(b) 


Nocturne, Op. 37, No. 1 - 


Chopin 


(c) 


Marche Hongroise , . . . 

MISS LEVINE 


Schubert' Liszt 


(a) 


Lullaby 

Violin Obligato by Mrs. Hobart 


Hanscom 


(b) 


Yesterday and To-day . , , . 


Spross 


(c) 


Loch Lomond , , , , 


Old Scotch 


(d) 


June ,,.,,. 

MISS FRAZIER 


Mrs. H. H. A. Beach 




Concertstuck, Op. 92 


Schumann 




MISS LEVINE 








Of m 







AUG 1 1915 



PRtSIOENTS OKHCE 



Monmouth College 

Conservatory of Music 

Monmouth, Illinois 

July, Nineteen Fourteen 




MONMOUTH COLLEGE BULLETIN 

MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS. SERIES No. XIV No. 2. 



Kn'ered at the Postcffice at Monmouth, Llino's, as Second Class Matte: 



MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 




Page Two 



CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



CONSERVATORY CALENDAR 

1914-15 



FALL TERM, SEPTEMBER 8, 1914— (15 Weeks) 

Sept. 8 — Tuesday, 9:00 a. m. — Examination, Enrollment and Registra- 
tion of Students. 

Sept. 9 — Wednesday, 8 a. m. — Examination, Enrollment and Registra- 
tion of Students. 

Sept. 9 — Wednesday, 1:30 p. m. — First term and First College Semester 
begin. Opening Exercises in Auditorium. 

Sept. 10 — Thursday — Recitations begin in all departments. 

Nov. 26-27 — Thursday and Friday — Thanksgiving Recess. 

Dec. 17 — Thursday, 8 p. m. — Term Recital. 

Dec. 19 — Saturday, 2 p. m. — Pupils' Recital. 

Dec. 23 — Wednesday, 6 p. m. — Holiday Vacation. 

WINTER TERM, JANUARY 6, 1915 (11 Weeks) 

Jan. 6 — Wednesday, 1 to 5 p. m. — Conservatory Registration for the 

Winter Term. 
Jan. 7 — Thursday — Lessons begin in the Conservatory. 
Jan. 26 — Tuesday — First Semester of College closes. 
Jan. 27 — Wednesday, 1 p. m. — Second Semester of College. Opening 

Exercises in Auditorium. Registration 8 a. m. to 12 m. 
Feb. 14 — Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
March 18 — Thursday, 8 p. m. — Term Recital. 
March 20— Saturday, 2 p. m.— Pupils' Recital. 
March 23 — Tuesday, 6 p. m. — Spring Vacation begins. 

SPRING TERM, MARCH 26, 1915— (10 Weeks) 

March 31 — Wednesday, 1 to 5 p. m. — Conservatory Registration for 

Spring Term. 
April 1 — Thursday — Spring Term begins. 
June 8 — Tuesday, 2 p. m. — Pupils' Recital. 
June 9 — Wednesday, 2 p. m. — Term Recital. 
June 10 — Thursday — Commencement Day. 



Page Three 



MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



Faculty and Instructors 



T. MERRILL AUSTIN, Director of the Musical Conservatory; Voice, 
Organ, Interpretation, History. 

A. B., Thiel College, 1882; A. M., ibid, 1888; graduate of New Eng- 
land Conservatory of Music, Boston, 1887; finishing courses under 
Fred Sieber and Heinrich Ehrlich, Berlin, Germany, 1890-1891; 
Summer 1906 in London, England, in study with William Shakespeare 
and Alberto Randegger. 

EMILY L. THOMAS, Teacher of Advanced Piano. 

Graduate from New England Conservatory of Music, 1890; Piano with 
Carl Faelton; Post-graduate in Piano in New England Conservatory 
of Music, with Carl Baermann, 1900; studied in Berlin, Germany, with 
Leopold Godowsky, 1903-'04; continued study with Rudolph Ganz, 
summer of 1907. 

KATHARIN FINLEY, Teacher of Violin and Piano. 

Graduate of American Conservatory, 1908; Postgraduate study under 
Herbert Butler, Summer 1912-'13. 

THOMAS HOFFMAN HAMILTON, Instructor in Voice, Harmony, Ana- 
lytical Harmony, Counterpoint. 

A. B., Monmouth College, 1907; Graduate Monmouth College Con- 
servatory, 1911, in Piano; 1914, in Voice; Graduate Student in Eng- 
lish, University of Chicago, 1912; Studied Voice with Thomas Mc- 
Burney, and Piano with Allen Spencer, Chicago, 1912. 

NELLE PORTER, Voice Instructor. 

Graduate Monmouth College Conservatory of Music, 1905; Post- 
graduate course, 1907-'10. 

MARIE KETTERING, Teacher of Piano. 

Graduate Monmouth College Conservatory, 1906; Postgraduate work 
in Monmouth College Conservatory, 1910-'ll. 

EDNA SMITH, Instructor in Methods (Public School Music). 

Graduate Monmouth College Conservatory, 1912; Teacher of Meth- 
ods in the Public Schools of Monmouth; Silver Burdette Summer 
Course. 



Page Four 



CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE 
CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



Stands in the front rank of the well equipped and successful music 
schools of the Midde West. 

This prominent position has been attained by the employment of in- 
structors of a high order of musicianship, and by constant aspiration after 
lofty ideals. 

Broad and cultured musicianship is the key-note of the institution. 

Its aim is to give a deep and thorough knowledge of music as well 
as to develop highly artistic performers. 

Voice 

The Vocal Department is under the immediate supervision of the 
Director. The fresh voices carefully placed and artistically trained which 
are the product of this department stand as its best testimonial. The di- 
rector is ably assisted in this department by two of his school's most 
promising pupils and post-graduates. Mr. Thos. H. Hamilton and Miss 
Nelle Porter. They have shown themselves eminently fitted for founda- 
tional voice teaching. They are proficient in developing voices, and 
placing them ready for advanced study in finish and style. 

The fact that in this department voices have been developed which 
can successfully sing the solo roles in the Standard Oratorios, which has 
been done repeatedly, speak of its worth. This year the Oratorios 
Handel's "Messiah" and Mendelssohn's ''St. Paul" have been produced 
with our students singing the solo roles in an artistic manner. 

Piano 

In a Conservatory of Music the Piano department is a highly impor- 
tant one. The piano is the instrument of the home as well as the con- 
cert platform, and for the former as well as the latter its performers 
should have thorough and artistic training. 

To this end we commend to our patrons a fine array of capable and 
successful teachers. At the head of this department stands Miss Thomas, 
a teacher of wide experience, whose graduates by their performance 
attest her careful and artistic training. The entire work of the depart- 
ment is so arranged that a pupil can change from one of the under 
teachers into the classes of Miss Thomas without any loss of time by the 
change. 

The undergraduate work is in the hands of two strong teachers. 
Miss Kettering and Miss Finley, both of whom are pupils of our grad- 
uating teacher. Miss Thomas, which gives us a department with uniform 
methods. 



Page Five 



MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 




Page Six 



CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



Violin 

This Department has become one of the strong departments of the 
Conservatory. The pupils which it has developed play with certainty, 
brilliancy and finish. Miss Katharin Finley, the instructor, has proven 
herself a brilliant concert performer as well as a most efficient teacher. 
Prospective study. Summer 1914 under the celebrated teacher, Emil 
Heermann of Cincinnati. Her work with the College Orchestra has 
placed it in the front rank of college organizations. 

Organ 

The Director, who had large metropolitan experience as both organist 
and choir director, has charge of this department. His wide experience 
in controlling voices together with knowledge of the organ, makes him 
very successful in training competent church organists. With our large 
modern organ, we offer organ study excelled by few schools. 

Theory 

The importance of this department in the education of a pupil can- 
not be over-estimated. The theory of music is to music what grammar 
and mathematics are to a literary education. It is necessary to the 
proper understanding and correct conception and interpretation of the 
subject. 

Harmony, Analytical Harmony, Counterpoint, 
Composition 

Mr. Hamilton, who has charge of this department, is one of our best 
theory graduates, also a graduate of Monmouth College with the degree 
of A. B. With his wide theory study and his trained collegiate mind 
Mr. Hamilton has made this department not only interesting, but also 
a thorough basis for the serious study of music. 

Interpretation, History, Normal Course 

The first two courses are planned for the development of the artis- 
tic and interpretative faculties of the pupils. They are designed to lead 
the pupil by means of historical setting, and by the study of the com- 
positor's meaning to understand and present the content and intent of the 
composition. 

The Normal Course is designed to assist the pupil to arrange his 
knowledge, and reduce his material to a system adapted to the instruc- 
tion of a pupil from the elementary to the advanced stages. 

To these three courses the director brings the benefit of his wide 
study and extensive experience. 



Page Seven 



MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 



Methods 

The Course in Methods is proving popular and a number of young- 
women have been preparing themselves for Public School work. Miss 
Smith, who has charge of this department, has had thorough preparation 
for her work. She is a graduate of the Methods Course, as well as a 
vocal graduate of our own Conservatory. Having charge of the music 
in the Public Schools of Monmouth, she is enabled to give practical illus- 
trations of her methods. 

There is a good demand for method teachers who not only have a 
knowledge of sight singing, but also of vocal principles and music in 
general. 

Equipment 

The large concert room is equipped with a Mason & Hamlin Artist 
Concert Grand and a Steck Grand. These with our beautiful Memorial 
Organ permit us to present our recitals and concerts in an artistic man- 
ner. The small recital room has also a Mason & Hamlin Grand, which 
makes our pupils' recitals enjoyable. 

The studios are equipped with good teaching pianos of the best 
standard makes. 

Recitals, Etc. 

It is only by constantly performing before others that a pupil gets 
such control of himself that he is enabled to appear to the best advantage 
Recognizing this, a pupils' bi-weekly recital is planned at which pupils 
sufficiently prepared, perform before the members of the faculty and 
students of the Conservatory. These are not public recitals, rather 
"enfamile," but preparation for public work. 

At the close of each term two public recitals are given; one a term 
recital given by the most advanced pupils and a pupils' recital by those 
who have reached a stage of proficiency to' benefit by public appearance. 

At frequent intervals recitals are given by members of the Faculty, 
at which there is an explanation of the music performed, thus giving the 
students an opportunity to hear good music performed in an artistic 
manner. 

In addition to the Choral Concerts, Faculty and Pupils' Recitals, there 
are many concerts of high order during the year which the students can 
attend. 

The Artists' Course has added so much to the pleasure and profit of 
the students that it has become a permanent feature. In order that each 
music student may get full benefit personally, pupils over 12 years of age 
will be required to attend and the expense of next year's course, $1, will 
be added to the tuition of the Fall term, the ticket not being transferable. 
If, however, the pupil is not in attendance the Winter term and course not 
yet completed, upon application the ticket will be exchanged for one that 
can be sold. 

The Lecture and Artists' Courses will be combined this year and 
music students can have the choice of the entire course at $2.00 or of the 
numbers of the Artists' Course at $1.00 as heretofore. 



Papre Eight 



CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 




Page Nine 



MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 



COURSES 



The work of the Conservatory is divided into departments, graduation 
from any one of which requires, in addition to its own completion, a good 
English education; the completion of year's work in one collegiate sub- 
ject, this subject to be chosen from the Modern Language or the English 
Course; certain specified work in Harmony, Counterpoint or Analytical 
Harmony, Theory and History, and the giving of a Recital, except in the 
Teacher's Course, in which the pupil must do special work in preparation 
for teaching. 

It is expected that all pupils, in their graduating year, will take not 
less than two private lessons a week, and it is advised that in the winter 
term, piano pupils, especially, shall take three lessons a week in order 
that their programs may be artistically prepared. 

Certificate 

It has been decided to offer a certificate to any pupil who has com- 
pleted the requirements of his Junior year in any department and has 
appeared successfully in a public performance during the Junior year, 
giving his performance from memory. In addition to completing the re- 
quired work in his department, he must complete the Harmony and In- 
terpretation courses. 



PIANO 

This course is laid out on broad lines, consisting of a preparatory 
and comprehensive collegiate course, the latter requiring four years 
for an average student to complete. 

Appended is a specimen course formed on the study or etude system 
along with which will be taught salon pieces and as many works of the 
masters as can be thoroughly learned. 

Modern teaching has shown that individuality must be cultivated. 
This desired end may be best attained by students who do not accomplish 
rapid results by the etude system with a course of technique and pieces 
carefully selected to accomplish the principles involved in the studies. 

The completion of the Harmony, Counterpoint, or Analytical Har- 
mony, History of Music, Biographical History, and the Interpretation 
Course, and the giving of a public Recital are required for graduation in 
this course. 



Page Ten 



CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



Preparatory 

Table and piano work for finger and wrist development with special 
attention to the development of the finger legato touch, major scales, 
chords, and arpeggios. Studies by Kohler, Duvernoy and Loeschorn. 

Intermediate Collegiate 

Technical work selected from Faelton's Preparatory Exercises, 
Kleine, Pischna and Mason. 

Studies and Etudes selected from Bertini, Heller (Phrasing), Krause 
(Trill), Berens (Velocity), Bach (Little Preludes and Fugues, Two and 
Three Part Inventions), Cramer. 

Advanced Collegiate 

Technical work selected from Pischna, Tausig, Joseffy. 

Studies and Etudes selected from Clementi (Gradus ad Parnassum), 
Kessler, Moscheles, Bach (Well Tempered Clavichord), Chopin (Etudes). 

Salon pieces, selections from the best modern writers and the classics 
throughout the entire course. 

Pupils must have thoroughly studied and be able to render in a cred- 
itable manner the following compositions before entering the graduation 
year: 

One Mozart Sonata, two Beethoven Sonatas, three Preludes and Fu- 
gues from Bach's Well Tempered Clavichord, the following list by Chopin, 
two Mazourkas, two Waltzes, one Nocturne, one Polonaise, three Etudes, 
two Compositions by Schubert, two by Schumann. 



VOICE CULTURE 



In this department advantages are offered which lead to the highest 
attainment in this line of work. 

Voice Placing 

Especial attention is given to the proper placing of the voice. This 
is considered of the utmost importance, as a neglect of it almost invar- 
iably results in a permanent injury to the voice and often to the health. 

To accomplish this the pupil is instructed in a proper control of the 
breath, a perfect control of the registers, a free and easy emission of the 
tone, and a knowledge of the different timbres of the voice. 

By these means the voice is produced with equal beauty and brilliancy 
throughout the entire compass. 

This course will be upon the same lines as the piano course, prepara- 
tory, intermediate collegiate, and advanced collegiate, taking approx- 
imately, the same length of time. 



Page Eleven 



MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 



The definite length of this course must largely be determined by the 
readiness of the individual voice to respond to training. 

The completion of the Harmony, History of Music, Biographical His- 
tory, and the Interpretation Courses, and the giving of a Recital are re- 
quired for graduation. The pupil is advised to take the Course in Analy- 
tical Harmony and is also expected to take three years of piano. 

Preparatory 

A thorough knowledge of the principles of breathing and breath con- 
trol is imparted; exercises in breathing and tone placing; in agility and 
relaxation of muscles (pure tones cannot be produced with rigid muscles); 
Ferd Seiber's eight measure studies and the ten studies of Op. 44-49; 
simple songs, carefully selected to assist the pupil in conquering his dif- 
ficulties, will be used. 

Intermediate Collegiate 

Exercises in agility, uniting of the tones, the swell, mezza voice, em- 
bellishments; Books I and H of Masterpieces of Vocalization, which is a 
graded series of vocal studies selected from the celebrated works of all 
the great masters of singing. 

Advanced Collegiate 

Advanced exercises in agility, covering all kinds of scales and chords 
in both major and minor, mezza voice, trill, also exercises for strengthen- 
ing the voice;Books HI and IV of Masterpieces of Vocalization. 

Throughout the entire course a careful selection of songs from the 
best American, English, German, French and Italian writers will be used, 
also arias from the operas and standard oratorios. While songs in the 
foreign tongue will be taught in the vernacular, the greatest pains will 
be taken to give the pupil a clear and intelligent ennuciation of the Eng- 
lish language, and the advice will be to sing in our native tongue when- 
ever practicable. A rich and full repertoire of songs and arias will be 
required before graduation. 

It is advised that voice pupils study German and French. 



PIPE ORGAN 



Our Memorial Organ, the gift of Mrs. Delia Davidson Worley and 
Mrs. Nellie Davidson Doerr, in memory of their mother, places us in a 
position to offer advantages in the line of organ study that few schools, 
even in the largest art centers, can surpass. The mechanical part of the 
organ is as complete as the very largest organs, giving pupils unsurpassed 



Page Twelve 



CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



experience in registration. The tone is beautiful and refined, and the ac- 
tion leaves nothing to be desired. 

In order to enter upon the study of the organ it will be necessary to 
have completed the preparatory and the first year of the collegiate course 
in piano, and it is advised to keep up the study of the piano along with 
the organ study through the first two years' work. 

The course will be three years in length. The completion of the Har- 
mony, Counterpoint, History of Music, Biographical History and Inter- 
pretation Course, attendance at chorus class for one year and the giving 
of a Recital will be required for graduation. 

Organ Course 

Modern School of Organ by Charles E. Clemens, supplemented by 
work in Schneider's Trios, Rheinberger Trios, Buck and Nilson Pedal Tech- 
nique embodying the priciples of pedal obligato playing; manual work and 
registration. 

Playing of church tunes and anthems, selections from the best writers 
for this instrument, including the English and French Schools; Sonatas 
by Mendelssohn, Merkel, Rheinberger, Guilmant, and the works of Bach. 
Special care is taken in forming competent church organists. 



VIOLIN 



Preparatory 



The correct method of holding the violin and bow. The Joachim 
system of bowing is used, which requires flexibility of the wrist and a 
free use of the forearm. 

Selected studies from Dancla, Langey, Kayser, and Mezar are used; 
also Schradeick, Scales and Book of Technique, and David Book I. 

Collegiate 

David Violin School Book II., Seveik, Kreutzer, Rede, Rovelli, Fiorillo, 
Sonatas by LeClair, Tartini and Haendel; concerts by Seitz-Accolay, 
Viotti de Beriot, Bach, Mendelssohn, Bruch. 

Selections from the best composers are used throughout the course, 
with a view to applying the principles of bowing, tone production and 
expression. 

Practice in ensemble work is also offered the pupil. 

Same theory requirements as in Piano Course. 



Page Thirteen 



MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 




Page Fourteen 



CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



THEORY 



Harmony 

A thorough knowledge of keys, scales, signatures, intervals, triads, 
chord connections, chords of all kinds, including altered and augumented; 
suspensions, passing chords, melodic changes, organ point and the har- 
monizing of melodies and chorals will be required. The playing of mod- 
ulations of many kinds through all keys. 

Counterpoint 

Two part, three part and four part counterpoint, imitation. 

Analytical Harmony 

Principles of Analysis; Reduction of florid passages; a thorough 
dissection of Harmonic form. 

History 

The general history of music showing its growth and development. 

Early Christian Music, Polyphonic Music, Monophonic Music, the 
rise of Instrumental Music in the classic form, the Opera, the Oratorio, 
Romantic Music. 

The History Course comprises a year's work, one lesson a week. It 
is divided into 20 weeks of general history study, supplemented by a card 
system and lectures covering the entire field of Musical History. The last 
15 weeks are devoted to Biographical History, which is taught by means 
of an exhaustive study of the lives, methods and styles of writing, and 
general characteristics of twelve of the greatest writers of music. 

Interpretation and Analysis 

The subjects comprise a course of one lesson a week through the en- 
tire year. They are given in the form of lectures which explain all points 
of Interpretation, Analysis, the different forms of Music, the Orchestra, 
Sound, etc. 

Methods 

The new course in Methods, or the principles of teaching music in the 
Public Schools, has met with much success. It covers a complete plan for 
the presentation of each lesson for the entire eight grades for the Public 
Schools. The work is normal in its character. The advantage of taking 
such a subject in a school where lessons in Voice Culture, Interpretation, 
History, Harmony, etc., can be taken is apparent. Practical demonstra- 
tion of the work of this Course is afforded in the Public Schools of Mon- 
mouth. 



Page Fifteen 



MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 



Post Graduate Course 

Work is offered in all departments to graduates or advanced stu- 
dents which will be devoted chiefly to repertoire. This course is becoming 
very popular as shown by the number of our graduates returning for ad- 
vanced work. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CHORAL 
SOCIETY 



This society, while having its own officers and conducting its own 
affairs, is affiliated with the College, and offers students, at a merely 
nominal fee, the advantage of a first-class chorus drill. Concerts of the 
highest grade are given each year by the society. All those who can 
sing and carry a part are urged to join this society. 

The practical workings of the society are shown by the following 
public appearances: 

The Mid-Winter Concert when the Society gave Handel's "Messiah" 
with Conservatory soloists, and the May Festival when we had a superb 
concert by the Minneapolis Orchestra under the leadership of Emil Ober- 
hoffer, and a great rendition of Mendelssohn's "St. Paul" in the evening 
by the Society and most efficient soloists from the Conservatory. 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE ORCHESTRA 



Our Orchestra is one of the strong organizations of the Conservatory. 
It is of great value in giving practical experience to the students of 
stringed instruments. 

The accompaniment for Mendelssohn's "St. Paul" was played by 10 
Conservatory strings, piano and organ, and showed the efficiency of our 
string department. 



MUSIC ELECTIVES 



College credit will be given for the following courses in musical theory 
when elected under the same conditions as courses in other departments, 
provided the election is approved in advance by the Director of the Con- 
servatory of Music and the student's adviser. No credit will be given. 



Page Sixteen 



CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



however, for work not continued for at least one full year, and the total 
amount of credit received by any student shall not exceed 8 hours. 

For detailed account of these courses see the announcement under 
their separate headings: 

Music I. — Harmony: First semester, two recitations per week, 2 hrs. 

Music 11. — Harmony: Continuation of Music I. Second semester, 
two recitations per week, 2 hours. 

Music IIL — Counterpoint: First semester, 1 hour. 

Music IV. — Counterpoint: Continuation of Music III. Second sem- 
ester, 1 hour. 

Music VI. — History of Music: Continuation of Music V. Second sem- 

Music VI. — History of Music: Contiuation of Music V. Second sem- 
ester, 1 hour. 

Music VII. — Interpretation and Analysis: First Semester, 1 hour. 

Music VIII. — Interpretation and Analysis: Continuation of Music 
VII. Second semester, 1 hour. 



LADIES' DORMITORY 



This modern, fireproof building- will be ready for use at the opening 
in September. It is complete in all of its appointments and is one of the 
finest buildings in the State devoted to dormitory use. It cost $100,000. 
Music students can have the privilege of living in this magnificent build- 
ing where terms are very reasonable, or securing rooms and boarding in 
private homes. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



In order to secure a diploma the student must have finished the pre- 
scribed work, and must have spent at least one year in this institution. 

The privileges of the Musical Department are not extended on the 
same grounds to holders of scholarships as are the privileges of other 
departments of the College. 

Students attending College who desire to take musical instruction 
are expected to take lessons in this department. No credits will be given 
for lessons taken elsewhere. 

Pupils should report to the President of the College, with whom they 
will make all their arrangements for entrance. 

About one hundred volumes of the best musical literature, including 
histories, biographies, etc., are in the Warren County Library. The read- 
ing room is free to all students. The Carnegie Library of the College, 
also contains quite a number of books on musical subjects, including 
Groves' Dictionary of Music and Musicians and late musical periodicals. 



Page Seventeen 



MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 



TUITION RATES FOR 1914-15 





SUBJECT 


LENGTH 
OF 

LESSONS 


NUMBER 

LESSONS 

PER WEEK 


TUITION 


TEACHER 


FALL 

TERM 

15 Weeks 


SPRING 

TERM 

10 Weeks 


WINTER 
TERM 

11 Weeks 


Mr. Austin 


Voice or 
Organ 

Interpre- 
tation 
History 


30 minutes 
30 minutes 
20 minutes 
Class 
Class 


One 
Two 

Two 
One 


$18.75 

37.50 

27.00 

6.00 

7.00 


$13.75 

27.50 

20.00 

5.00 

6.00 


$12.50 

25.00 

18.50 

5.00 

6.00 


Miss Thomas 


Piano 


30 minutes 
30 minutes 
20 minutes 


One 

Two 
Two 


$16.00 
33.00 
22.50 


$12.50 
24.00 
15.50 


$11.50 
23.00 
15.00 


Mr. Hamilton 


Harmony ) 

Counter- I 
point J 
Private / 
Classes 


39 minutes 
20 minutes 

60 minutes 


One 
Two 

Two 


$15.00 
20.00 

12.00 


$11.00 
14.75 

8 50 


$10.00 
13.50 

8.00 


Miss Finley 


Violin 


30 minutes 
30 minutes 
20 minutes 
or Class 


One 
Two 

Two 


$14.00 
28.00 

18.25 


$10.00 
20.00 

13.25 


$ 9.00 
18.00 

12.00 


Miss Kettering 
or 
Miss Finley 


Piano 


30 minutes 
30 minutes 
20 minutes 

or Class 


One 
Two 

Two 


$11.25 
22.50 

18.25 


$ 8.25 
16.50 

13.25 


$ 7.55 
15.00 

12.00 


Mr. Hamilton 
or 
Miss Porter 


Voice 


30 minutes 
30 mmutes 
20 minutes 

or Class 


One 

Two 

Two 


$11.25 
22.50 

18.25 


$ 8.25 
16.50 

13.25 


$ 7.50 
15.00 

12.00 


Miss Smith 


Methods 


30 minutes 
Class; 1 hour, 
not less than 3 


One 
One 


$11.25 
8.50 


$ 8.25 
7.00 


$ 7.50 
7.00 



It has been decided that it is best for all music students to attend 
both Lecture and Artist's courses, the fee for which will be $2.00. $1.00 
of this amount will be paid in the fall term and $1.00 in the Winter term. 
Required of all pupils over 12 years of age. 

Chorus, whole year, $2.50. 

First or Second Semester, each $1.50. 

Pianos can be rented and taken to pupil's room, or rented from pri- 
vate families at reasonable rates. Pipe Organ practice at 20 cents an 
hour. Pupils can enter at any time, but when entering later than the 
opening of the term one more lesson will be charged than taken. 

The above rates are for lessons by the term, not by single lessons. 



Page Eighteen 




CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



Page Nineteen 



MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 



IMPORTANT RECITALS AND 
CONCERTS 1913-14 

FACULTY RECITAL, OCTOBER 23, 1913, 8 P. M. 

Miss Emily L. Thomas _______ Piano 

assisted by 
Miss Dorothy Austin _______ Soprano 

ARTISTS' RECITAL, OCTOBER 30, 1913, 8 P. M. 

The Zoellner String Quartette 

ARTISTS' RECITAL, NOVEMBER 20, 1913, 8 P. M. 

Enrico Palmetto ________ Tenor 

Martin Bruhl - -- - - - - - - Piano 

THE MESSIAH, DECEMBER 16, 1913, 8 P. M. 

College Choral Society, Conservatory Soloists 

ARTISTS' RECITAL, JANUARY 20, 1914, 8 P. M. 

Miss Delia Thai .___-____ Piano 

ARTISTS' RECITAL, MARCH 31, 1914, 8 P. M. 

Edward Clarke _______ Bass-Baritone 

T. Merrill Austin _______ Accompanist 

MAY FESTIVAL, MAY 11, 1914. 
OCHESTRAL CONCERT, 2:30 P. M. 

The Minneapolis Orchestra 
Emil Oberhoffer, Conductor 

Leonora Allen ________ Soprano 

Fredric Freemantle ________ Tenor 

Richard Czerwonky ________ Violin 

CHORAL CONCERT, 8:15 P. M. 

St. Paul, Part I _.-__-_ By Mendelssohn 

College Choral Society, Conservatory Soloists 



Paiure Twenty 



CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



GRADUATING RECITAL 



May Twenty-first 

HARRIETTS KYLER PEASE, Contralto 
RUTH EFNOR LANPHERE, Organ 

Rest In The Lord ------- Mendelssohn 

Fior di Dolcezza -___-_ E. Del Valle de Paz 

L'Esclave ---------- Lalo 

Ritournelle ---------- Chaminade 

Miss Pease 

Fantasie and Fugue in A Minor ------ Bach 

Abendlied -------- Schumann-Best 

In Paradisum --------- Dubois 

Miss Lanphere 

None But the Lonely Heart - - - - - . - Schubert 

The Linden Tree -------- Schubert 

All Night Long I'm Dreaming ----- Schumann 

Now Wherefore Should I Wander - - - - Schumann 

Miss Pease 



First Sonata ------- 

Largo e maestoso. Allegro. 

Pastorale (Andante quasi Allegretto). 

Finale — Allegro assai. Andate maestoso. 
Miss Lanphere 



Guilmant 



The Danza --------- Chadwick 

Bes' of All -------- Walter Kramer 

To You --------- Oley Speaks 

Invictus --------- Bruno Huhn 

Miss Pease 

Chanson Du Matin -------- Gaul 

Marche Triomphale ------- Callaerts 

Miss Lanphere 

Both graduates are pupils of T. Merrill Austin. 



Page Twenty-one 



MONMOUTH 
COLLEGE 



GRADUATING RECITAL 



May Twenty-eighth 

EVANGELINE CARNAHAN, Soprano 
THOMAS HOFFMAN HAMILTON, Baritone 

Deh vieni alia finestra (Don Giovanni) _ _ _ _ Mozart 

Del suo cor (Mignon) -_-____ Thomas 
It Is Enough (Elijah) ---__. Mendelssohn 

Mr. Hamilton 

As When the Dove (Acis and Galatea) _ _ _ _ Handel 

L'Insana Parola (Aida) ----___ Verdi 

Miss Carnahan 

Moonlight _-_-.____ Schumann 

In Liebeslust _________ Liszt 

All Souls' Day ________ Strauss 

To the Evening Star (Tannhauser) _ _ _ _ Wagner 

Mr. Hamilton 

Ave Maria _________ Schubert 

Liebestreu - - - - - -- - - Brahms 

Solvejg's Slumber Song _______ Grieg 

Elsa's Dream (Lohengrin) ______ Wagner 

Miss Carnahan 

I Have Led Her Home - - - - - - Whelpley 

Kashmiri Song ______ Woodforde-Finden 

Cradle Song ________ Carpenter 

Only in Dreams ________ Crosse 

The Daughter of Mendoza ______ Chadwick 

Mr. Hamilton 

Pierrot -_-____-__ Rubner 

My Scotch Lassie ______ Marschal-Loepke 

The Cock Shall Crow _______ Carpenter 

Grey Eyes _________ Philips 

Parla _.._____.__ Arditi 

Miss Carnahan 

Both graduates are pupils of T. Merrill Austin. 



Papre Twenty-two 



CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



GRADUATING RECITAL 



June Second 

VERA MAUDE McLAUGHLIN, Soprano 
STELLA GILMORE, Piano 

Who Is Sylvia? _--_-.__ Schubert 

Gewitternacht _-_--_--_ Franz 

Vanne, disse (Robert le Diable) _ _ _ _ Meyerbeer 

Miss McLaughlin 

Sonata, Opus 31, No. 2 ______ Beethoven 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Allegretto 

Miss Gilmore 

I Dare Not, Cannot Believe It - - - - - Schumann 
I Love Thee _________ Grieg- 

Farewell, Ye Mountains (Jeanne d'Arc) - - Tschaikowsky 

Miss McLaughlin 

An Den Fruhling, Opus 43 ______ Grieg- 

Ballade, Opus 20 ________ Reinecke 

Nocturne, Opus 37, No. 1------- Chopin 

Polonaise, Opus 46, No. 12 ______ MacDowell 

Miss Gilmore 

Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal _____ Whelpley 

A Spirit-Flower ______ Campbell-Tipton 

I Hear a Thrush at Eve - - - - - - - Cadman 

Blossom-Time _________ Salter 

Nymphs and Fauns _______ Bemberg 

Miss McLaughlin 

Concerto, Opus 79 ________ Weber 

Second Movement 

Miss Gilmore 
Second Part played by Mr. George Leonard Nicol 

The Soprano is a pupil of T. Merrill Austin. 
The Pianist is a pupil of Emily L. Thomas. 



Page Twenty-three 






MONMOUTH COLLEGE 

CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



>i.H 



J9^.. 



%. 



Monmouth College 

Conservatory of Music 

Monmouth, Illinois 

July, Nineteen Sixteen 




MONMOUTH COLLEGE BULLETIN 

MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS. SERIES No. XVI. No. 2. 

Entered at the Postolfice at Monmouth, Illinois, as Second Class Matter 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 




FACULTY. 



T. MERRILL AUSTIN, Director of 
the Musical Conservatory, 1101 
East Broadway. Voice, Interpre- 
tation, History, Organ. A. B., 
Thiel College, 1882; A. M., ibid, 
1888; graduate of New England 
Conservatory of Music, Boston, 
1887; finishing courses under Fred 
Sieber and Heinrich Ehrlich, Berlin, 
Germany, 1890-'91; Summer 1906 in 
London, England, in study with 
William Shakespeare and Alberto 
Randegger. 

EMILY L. THOMAS, Teacher of Ad- 
vanced Piano, 733 East Broadway. 
Graduate from New England Con- 
servatory of Music, 1890; Piano 
with Carl Faelton; Post-graduate 
in piano in New England Conserva- 
tory of Music, with Carl Baermann, 
1900; Studied in Berlin, Germany, 
with Leopold Godowsky, 1903-'04; 
Voice in New England Conservatory 
with W. L. Whitney; Continued 
study with Rudolph Ganz, summer 
of 1907. 



E. EARLE FABER, Teacher of Voice, 
Analytical Harmony and Counter- 
point, 801 East First Avenue. Grad- 
uate Monmouth College Conserva- 
tory 1915; Review of Theory Course 
with Royal D. Hughes, Summer of 
1915. Postgraduate student in voice 
1915-'16. 



PAGE TWO 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



FACULTY. 



KATHARIN FINLEY, Violin, Piano, 
Cello. Graduate American Conser- 
vatory, Chicago, 1908; Post Grad- 
uate work with Herbert Butler, 
1910-'10, and Summer 1912- 
'13; Summer 1914, Emil Herrmann, 
College of Music, Cincinnati; Pupil 
of Hugo Kortschak, Chicago, 1915- 
'16; Piano, Monmouth College Con- 
servatory; Cello, Franz Wagner, 
Chicago 1&15-'16. 



EDNA SMITH, Instructor in Methods 
(Public School Music). Graduate 
of Monmouth College Conservatory, 
1912. Graduate Silver Burdett 
Summer Methods Course. 



MARIE KETTERING, Teacher of 
Piano, 903 East Broadway. Grad- 
uate of Monmouth College Conser- 
vatory, 1906; Post graduate work 
in Monmouth College Conservatory, 
1910-'ll; Post graduate work under 
Glenn Dillard Gunn, Chicago. 





PAGE THREE 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 




PAGE FOUR 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



A CONSERVATORY 
What and Why? 



Conservation of resources is acknowledged to be one of the great- 
est sources of power. This is true equally of nature, art, and human 
talent. A conservatory is where musical talents are conserved, devel- 
oped and trained. A true interpreter of music must have talent and 
must be skillful in the use of his instrument. But he must first of all 
be well grounded in the foundational principles of music, and he must 
have had a knowledge of the breadth and scope of his art. 

Environment has a deep effect upon the mind and character. The 
influences to which a student is subjected in a conservatory must neces- 
sarily produce results unobtainable under a private teacher. In a con- 
servatory the special teachers of the various branches working in sym- 
pathy tend to develop a well-rounded musician. Some of these subjects 
can be taught in classes. This reduces the expense and also offers 
competitive stimulus. 



PAGE FIVE 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



=OUR AIM IS = 

Musical Knowledge. 

Technical Skill. 

Artistic Interpretation, 



What foundation should be laid for true musical 
knowledge? 

First — A good literary education. 

Second — A fair mastery of piano, the pedagogic instrument of 
music. 

Third — Courses in harmony, counter point, interpretation, analysis 
and history of music, these later branches being necessary to bring the 
construction and development of the art vividly before the student. 

What is necessary to produce technical skill? 

A thoroly educated and experienced teacher who can skillfully 
direct and wisely correct faults. 

Opportunity to perforin until self control is obtained. 

What is artistic interpretation? 

The power to reproduce for the hearer the thot of the composer. 
A conservatory assists the student in this direction. First, by 



PAGE SIX 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



means of the teacher thru explanation and illustration. Second 
thru a knowledge of the historic settings of the composition, and third, 
thru the recitals, artists' courses and other public musical events, 
which furnish high ideals for the student. 

FACULTY. 

THE STRENGTH OF A CONSERVATORY LIES IN ITS 
FACULTY. By reference to the list of teachers on pages 2 and 3 it may 
be seen that the teachers of Monmouth College Conservatory are men and 
women of broad education and wide experience. 

THE PRODUCTS OF A CONSERVATORY ARE SHOWN BY ITS 
GRADUATES. Our graduates are filling positions as directors and 
teachers of music in other conservatories, as church soloists, concert 
singers and private teachers. 

RECITALS. 

One great hindrance to the satisfactory performance of the stu- 
dent is the lack of self control. This can only be overcome by repeated 
public appearance. Opportunity to provide for this is furnished by 
recitals— bi-weekly, term, junior, graduate. One essential to the creat- 
ing of a musical atmosphere is the opportunity to hear good music. To 
meet this need there are furnished the faculty recitals, artists' course, 
choral concerts, music club concerts. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The equipment of a conservatory is essential to the production of 
satisfactory results. Monmouth College Conservatory is equipped 
with pleasant studios, furnished with high grade pianos, a large and 
small concert hall with Mason & Hamblin grand pianos and a large con- 
cert pipe organ. 

ADVANTAGES. 

The opportunity to pursue literary subjects under the efficient 

PAGE SEVEN 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



instructors of M. C. The environment of a collegiate atmosphere. The 
privilege to participate in the choral society, the glee clubs and orchestra. 
The influence of good music. The location of the conservatory in an 
accessible, beautiful and moral small city. A beautiful, comfortable and 
moderate priced home is provided for girl students in McMichael Home. 

COURSES. 

High grade courses are offered in piano, voice, organ, violin and 
methods or public school music. For graduation these courses require 
additional courses in harmony, counter point, interpretation, analysis and 
history of music. 

A full curriculum of the courses may be found on pages 71 to 79 
inclusive, of the college catalogue, which may be obtained on application 
to the college. 

The same careful attention is given to beginners and to those stu- 
dents who do not care to take a graduate course as to those entered for 
graduation. 




PAGE EIGHT 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



TUITION RATES FOR 1916-17. 





SUBJECT 


LENGTH 

OF 
LESSONS 


NUMBER 

LESSONS 

PER 

WEEK 


TUITION 


TEACHER 


FALL 

TERM 

14 WEEKS 


WINTER SPRING 

TERM TERM 

12 WEEKS ' 10 WEEKS 


Mr. Austin -- 


Voice or 
Organ 
Interpreta- 
tion 
History 


30 minutes 

30 minutes 

20 minutes 

or class 

Class 

Class 


One 
Two 
Two 

One 
One 


$17.50 

35.00 
25.00 

6.00 
7.00 


$15.00 

30.00 
22 00 

6.00 
7.00 


$12.50 
25.00 
18.50 

5.00 
6.00 


Miss Thomas 


Piano 


30 minutes 
30 minutes 
20 minutes 


One 
Two 
Two 


15.50 
31.00 
21.00 


13.00 
27.00 
18 00 


11.50 
23.00 
15.00 


Mr. Faber 


Harmony 

Private 

Theory 

Harmony 

in classes 


30 minutes 
20 minutes 

60 minutes 


One 

Two 

Two 


14.00 
18.50 

11.00 


12.00 
16.00 

9.50 


10.00 
13.50 




8.00 


Miss Finley 


Violin 


30 minutes 

30 minutes 

20 minutes 

or class 


One 

Two 

Two 


13.00 
26.00 

17.50 


11.00 
22.00 

14.50 


9.00 
• 18.00 

12.00 


Miss Kettering .. 
or 

Miss Finley 


> Piano 


30 minutes 

30 minutes 

JO minutes 

or class 


One 
Two 

Two 


10.50 
21.00 

17 50 


9.00 
18.00 

14.50 


7.50 
15.00 

12.00 


Mr. Faber. 


Voice 


30 minutes 

30 minutes 

20 minutes 

or class 


One 
Two 

Two 


10.50 
21.00 

17.00 


9.00 
18.00 

14.50 


7.50 
15.00 

12.00 


RHss Smith -. 


Methods 


30 minutes 
or class 


One 

One 


10.50 
8.50 


9.00 
8.00 


8.25 
7.00 



Artists' Course Tickets, $1.00. Required of all pupils over 12 
years of age. 

Chorus, whole year, $2.50. 

First or Second Semester, each $1.50. 

Pianos can be rented and taken to pupil's room, or rented from 
private families at reasonable rates. Pipe organ practice at 20 cents an 
hour. Pupils can enter at any time, but when entering later than the 
opening of the term one more lesson will be charged than taken. 

The above rates are for lessons by the term, not by single lessons. 



PAGE NINE 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



Important Recitals and Concerts 

1916-17. 



Artists' Recital, October 5, 8 p. m. Cyrena Van Gordon, mezzo 
contralto. T. Merrill Austin, accompanist. 

Artists' Recital, November 9, 8 p. m. The Kortschak Trio. 
Hugho Kortschak, violin; Bertha Hecker, cello; Isaac Van Grove, piano. 

Vesper service by Monmouth College Choral Society, December 
5, 3 p. m. Christmas Carol service. Conservatory soloists. 

Artists' Recital, January 21, 8 p. m. Evans Williams, tenor. 
Artists' Recital, February 27, 8 p. m. Thuel Burnham, piano. 

Choral Concert, Maritana, by Wallace, March 27, 8 p. m. Mon- 
mouth College Choral Society and Conservatory soloists. 

Artists' Recital, April 8, 8 p. m. Reynolds Sisters, sopranos. 
Costume folk songs, standard duets. 

Glee Club Concert, May 2, 8 p. m. 



PAGE TEN 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



May Ninth 



Graduating Recital 

LOIS FOWLER, Mezzo Contralto 
MARTHA GLASS. Piano 



O Rest In the Lord (Elijah) 

Euridice (Orfeo ed Euridice) 

II segreto per esser felici (Lucrezia Borgia) 

Me Voici Dans Son Boudoir (Mignon) 

Miss Fowler. 



Mendelssohn 

Gluck 

Donizetti 

A. Thomas 



Grieg- 



Sonata Opus 7 ------ 

Allegro Moderato. 

Andante Molto. 

Alia Menuetto. 
Miss Glass. 



Auf Dcm Wasser Zu Singcn • - Schubert 

Warum? ------ _ - _ Hildach 

Song of the Skylark ----____ Brahms 

My Heart is Weary (Nadeshda) - - - A. Goring Thomas 

Miss Fowler. 

Fantasia in C Minor - - - Mozart 

Br'er Rabbit Opus 61 No. 2 - - . - _ MacDowell 

Gnomenreigen (Dance of the Gnomes) - - _ _ Liszt 

Miss Glass. 

Pluck This Little Flower . _ - - - Landon Ronald 

The Little Gray Dove -------- Saar 

I Am Thy Harp - - - Woodman 

Spring's Singing _ - - MacFadyen 

Miss Fowler. 

Concerto Opus 43 ---____ Mendelssohn 

Serenade and Allegro Giojoso. 

2nd Piano — Miss Emily Thomas. 
Miss Glass. 

The piano graduate is from the class of Emily L. Thomas. 
The vocal graduate is from the classes of T. Merrill Austin. 
The accompaniments are played by Mr. Austin, 



PAGE ELEVEN 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



May Twelfth 



Graduating Recital 

CHAS. FORT, Baritone 

Assisted by 

Miss Katharin Finley, Violin 

Miss Marie Kettering, Piano 

Miss Hazel Lanphere, Piano 



Si, tra i ceppi -----___ Handel 

To Scenes of Peace Retiring Mozart 

Vision Fair (Herodiade) ___-.. _ Massenet 

Mr. Fort. 

Sonata for Piano and Violin in C Minor _ _ _ . Grieg 

Allegro Molto 

Allegretto alia Romanza 

Allegro animato 
Misses Kettering and Finley. 

Pilgrim's Song ________ Tschaikowsky 

March Violets --__-__ _ Schumann 

Wanderer's Night Song __--___ Schubert 

Old Heidelberg, Thou Fairest ------ Jensen 

Mr. Fort. 

Impromptu Op. 2, No. 1 - Leschetizky 

Liebestraume No. 3 -------- Liszt 

Nightingale -__-----_- Liszt 

Miss Lanphere. 

At Night -------- - Southwick 

Love Sings the Lark ----- _ - Bischoff 

Somewhere a Voice is Calling - Tate 

Yesterday and Today ----___. Spross 

Mr. Fort. 

The piano graduate is from the classes of Emily L. Thomas. 
The vocal graduate is from the classes of T. Merrill Austin. 
The accompaniments are played by Mr. Austin. 



PAGE TWELVE 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



May Eighteenth 



Graduating Recital 

EDNA HASTINGS, Lyric Soprano 
RUTH LANPHERE, Piano 



Angels, Ever Bright and Fair, Recit. and Air (Theodora) - Handel 

Ritomerai fra poco _-_ Hasse 

Una voce poco fa (Cavitina) _--___ Rossini 

Miss Hastings. 

Sonata, Op. 10, No. 3 ---_--_ Beethoven 

Presto. 

Largo. 

Rondo. 
Miss Lanphere. 

Margaret at the Spinning Wheel _ _ _ _ _ Schubert 

To the Nightingale ------__ Brahms 

The Lass With the Delicate Aii' - - - - - - Arne 

I Say That Nothing Shall Deter Me, Aria (Carmen) - - Bizet 

Miss Hastings. 

Valse Brillante, Op. 18-------- Chopin 

Told at Sunset, Op. 51 - - MacDowell 

Shadow Dance, Op. 39 ---____ MacDowell 

Rhapsodie Hongroise, No. 2 -__-___ Liszt 

Miss Lanphere. 

A Forest Song - Whelpley 

April Laugh Thy Girlish Laughter _ _ _ _ _ Osgood 

Slumber Song ----_-.- Gretchaninow 

L'Ardita, (Magnetic Waltz) _ - _ _ _ _ Arditi 

Miss Hastings. 

Variationen. Op. 2, (For two pianos) _ _ _ _ Sinding 

Miss Lanphere. 
Second piano — Miss Thomas. 

The piano graduate is from the classes of Emily L. Thomas. 
The vocal graduate is from the classes of T. Merrill Austin. 
The accompaniments are played by Mr. Austin. 



PAGE THIRTEEN 



MOMMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



Graduating Recital 

May Twenty-third 

AGNES CHRISTOPHER, Piano 
LEE BRIGHT, Tenor-Baritone 

Draw Near, All Ye People. Recit. (Elijah) 

Lord, God of Abraham. Aria ----- Mendelssohn 

Nina ---___-__ _ Perp^olesi 

Tutto e' deserto. Recit, 

111 Balen. Aria ----- _ (n Trovotore) Verdi 

Mr. Bright. 
Appassionata Sonata. Op. 57 - - - _ _ Beethoven 

Allegro. 

Andante con moto. 

Allegro ma non troppo. 
Miss Christopher. 
Remembrance _-------_ Brahms 

Serenade, Op. 7 --------- Pierne 

Gaze Upon Me, Eyes of Azure ------ Liszt 

Prologue (Pagliacci) ---_-__ Leoncavallo 

Mr. Bright. 
Impromptu Op. 142. No. 3 ---___ Schubert 

Carnaval Op. 9'-------- Schumann 

a. Pierrot. 

b. Arlequin. 

c. Valse Noble. 

d. Promenade. 

La Campanella ------ - Paganini-Liszt 

Miss Christopher. 
Apple Blossoms ----- . - - Lester 

A Love Note --------- Rogers 

Had You But Known ------- Marie Rich 

Neath Summei- Skies -------- Bell 

Mr. Bright. 
Sarabande - ------ Rameau-Godowsky 

Tambourin - - ----- Rameau-Godowsky 

Concert Arabesque (Strauss) ----- Schulz-Evler 

Miss Christopher. 

The piano graduate is from the classes of Emily L. Thomos. 
The vocal gi'aduate is from the classes of T. Merrill Austin. 
The accompaniments are played by Mr. Austin. 



PAGE FOURTEEN 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



Conservatory Calendar 

1916-17 

FALL TERM. 

Sept. 12 — Tuesday 9:00 a. m. — Registration. 

Sept. 13 — Wednesday 8:00 a. m. — Registration. 

Sept. 14 — Thursday — Lessons begin. 

Nov. 30-Dec. 1 — Thanksgiving recess. 

Dec. 15— (8:15 p. m.)— Term recital. 

Dec. 16— (2:30 p. m.)— Pupils recital. 

Dec. 19 — Fall term closes 5:00 p. m. 

WINTER TERM. 

Jan. 3 — Wednesday, Registration 1:3)0-5:00. 
Jan. 4 — Lessons begin. 
March 23 — Term recital, 8:15 p. m. 
March 24 — Pupils recital 2:30 p. m. 
March 27 — Winter term closes 5 p. m. 

SPRING TERM. 

April 4 — Wednesday, Registration 1:30 to 5:00. 

April 5 — Lessons begin. 

June 9 — Pupils recital 2:30 p. m. 

June 12— Term recital 2:30 p. m. 

June 13 — Spring term closes 5:00 p. m. 

June 14^ — Commencement exercises 10:00 a. m. 



PAGE FIFTEEN